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Car Insurance Fronting

gices
(Level 5)
28 Oct 2018 00:30, updated
22 Jan 2008, published

I sometimes ask myself whether it is worth doing something morally right or financially wise in this society of ever increasing prices. Take for example this 17 year old male who has just passed his driving test and is eager to get behind the wheels. He has spent roughly £900 on the 40 hours driving lessons which the DSA recommends, bought his first car for £3500 and is now looking for a cheap car insurance deal to get him going. What happens next? He receives insurance quotes no cheaper than £2500. This is unfortunately the reality faced by most new drivers. At 17 or under 25, you are at this point in your life where you are just starting up and you do not really have money saved and much to spend and still you are subjected to the highest insurance premiums of all.

Now you haven't gone through all this hassle to stop here, have you? So what do you do? You learn that if you take out the car insurance along with your parents, it will become unbelievably cheaper. All you have to do is ask your parents to put down their names as the main driver so that you can become an additional driver on the insurance policy. The only problem here is that you are not supposed to really do that. Why? Because the car is in your name and you will be using the car most of the time, so you should be the policy holder for the insurance too. If you do not disclose this information at the time of application for car insurance, then you will be doing what is called fronting on your car insurance.

Is fronting morally right?

Car insurance fronting is the tactic used by young and new drivers to reduce their insurance premiums. By allowing an experienced driver to become the main driver on their insurance policy, they significantly lower the premiums they will pay.

Fronting has been made illegal now because it presents a much higher risk for the insurers than what they have quoted you for. To them, the main driver should be the one using the car most of the time and any additional drivers should be driving occasionally.

It is on this basis and the fact that an experienced driver is less likely to be involved in an accident than a young driver that the premiums are considerably cheaper. Now if the young driver uses the car more than the main driver, it will be called fronting in car insurance terms and since it is associated with giving false information when getting a car insurance quote, it has been made illegal.

Not many insurance companies will reject your application if you decide to do that though but if you ever make a claim to them afterwards, then they can reject your claim based on the grounds of car insurance fronting. I do not condone this technique but if you, as a young or new driver, will be making such a massive saving, then is it morally right or not?

Sure, you run the risks of having your claim turned down if you ever make one and get 6 points on your license for fronting and also being charged with driving without car insurance, but is it financially worth all these risks? I shall leave you to answer this...

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anonymous
anonymous  (Level 2)
07 Jul 2012 21:06
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We have one car, which my husband and I share, and a son who's desperate to drive. He does not really need a car for getting to work though, only for weekend visits to his girlfriend, 60-odd miles away. If I were to buy another car under my own name, with me also as the main driver on the insurance and him second, but I loaned him the car most weekends, would this be fronting? At present if I want to use our car I often have to get up at 6am to drop my husband off, so it would be handy for me to have another at my disposal?

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